2015 Annual Report

Messages

In fact, over the last 15 years, our geothermal energy facilities incurred damage from extreme weather events totalingover PHP9 billion. However, more than 85 percent of this number was incurred only in the last five years! As a result, insurance premiums at EDC climbed from just PHP243 million in 2011 to PHP682 million in 2015. Insurers are now beginning to see extreme weather events as an everyday risk.

What has become clear to us is that weather patterns are no longer what they used to be and we need to quickly adapt to a changed planet. This is why EDC spent substantially on geohazard mapping, landslide mitigation, and typhoon proofing of our facilities last year. This included working with suppliers on new designs for our structures and vital sections of our power plants, built now to withstand the predicted 300 kph winds of the future.

EDC has also employed a team of more than a dozen dedicated and well-equipped disaster response professionals who are currently dispersed at our various plants. They are constantly training our internal corps of volunteers, as well as teaching local communities and government units to be force multipliers and first responders. At critical moments, they also helped overseas after the earthquakes in Nepal and Mt. Kinabalu, Sabah, not only in aiding relief efforts but also in gaining more experience and understanding on how we ourselves can be better prepared.

We also have close relationships with third party contractors who strategically position heavy equipment (cranes, bulldozers, and dump trucks) at our sites so they can be mobilized quickly to clear and repair roads after storms. This proved vital for mobilizing relief goods and medical supplies immediately after Yolanda and other storms. Our sites today also stockpile fuel, food, water, and communications equipment, which will enable our people to function under extreme emergencies.

Climate change doesn’t only bring more powerful typhoons but also drier summers. These past few weeks, we’ve also seen how drought and wildfires resulting from abnormally hot weather severely reduced agricultural food supply and burned hundreds of hectares of forests in Mt. Apo and Mt. Kanlaon, even threatening our power facilities in the area. In Mt. Apo, having learned from previous forest fires, EDC’s reforestation plots were designed with long and wide fire breaks to prevent forest fires from spreading to our side of the mountain and putting our assets at risk. Fortunately, there was no damage and no lives lost but drought and wildfires were yet another warning of how a climate changed planet could strike us. Our people were well prepared in these instances and fought the fires in coordination with local government and scores of volunteers. Yet, there were many lessons we took home from the experience that will help shore our defenses for future emergencies like these.

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In fact, over the last 15 years, our geothermal energy facilities incurred damage from extreme weather events totalingover PHP9 billion. However, more than 85 percent of this number was incurred only in the last five years! As a result, insurance premiums at EDC climbed from just PHP243 million in 2011 to PHP682 million in 2015. Insurers are now beginning to see extreme weather events as an everyday risk.

What has become clear to us is that weather patterns are no longer what they used to be and we need to quickly adapt to a changed planet. This is why EDC spent substantially on geohazard mapping, landslide mitigation, and typhoon proofing of our facilities last year. This included working with suppliers on new designs for our structures and vital sections of our power plants, built now to withstand the predicted 300 kph winds of the future.

EDC has also employed a team of more than a dozen dedicated and well-equipped disaster response professionals who are currently dispersed at our various plants. They are constantly training our internal corps of volunteers, as well as teaching local communities and government units to be force multipliers and first responders. At critical moments, they also helped overseas after the earthquakes in Nepal and Mt. Kinabalu, Sabah, not only in aiding relief efforts but also in gaining more experience and understanding on how we ourselves can be better prepared.

We also have close relationships with third party contractors who strategically position heavy equipment (cranes, bulldozers, and dump trucks) at our sites so they can be mobilized quickly to clear and repair roads after storms. This proved vital for mobilizing relief goods and medical supplies immediately after Yolanda and other storms. Our sites today also stockpile fuel, food, water, and communications equipment, which will enable our people to function under extreme emergencies.

Climate change doesn’t only bring more powerful typhoons but also drier summers. These past few weeks, we’ve also seen how drought and wildfires resulting from abnormally hot weather severely reduced agricultural food supply and burned hundreds of hectares of forests in Mt. Apo and Mt. Kanlaon, even threatening our power facilities in the area. In Mt. Apo, having learned from previous forest fires, EDC’s reforestation plots were designed with long and wide fire breaks to prevent forest fires from spreading to our side of the mountain and putting our assets at risk. Fortunately, there was no damage and no lives lost but drought and wildfires were yet another warning of how a climate changed planet could strike us. Our people were well prepared in these instances and fought the fires in coordination with local government and scores of volunteers. Yet, there were many lessons we took home from the experience that will help shore our defenses for future emergencies like these.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5