2015 Annual Report

Messages

Dear fellow stakeholders,

Just last March 2016, I sat with a crowd of over 700 other people here in Manila listening to Al Gore weave his two-hour presentation on the state of the global climate. His presentation, updated through the years, was even more impressive since the time I first saw it in 2006. It was all the more persuasive and alarming today, because climate data and observational evidence from all over the world just serves to strengthen the point he was making more than a decade ago: that man-made climate change is real, deadly serious, and we had better do something fast, if we want to avoid a global catastrophe.

I was struck as he emphasized a particular point: “All our infrastructure was built for a world that’s now changing.” Immediately, images of our typhoon-damaged plants in Leyte engulfed my mind. I’m sure you all remember, when Typhoon Yolanda hit in November 2013, much of what worked reasonably for close to four decades, particularly at our subsidiary, Energy Development Corporation’s (EDC) geothermal plants, was overwhelmed by a force no one had ever seen before. The forces unleashed by climate change are now more powerful than they’ve ever been, which necessitates that we build stronger as we move forward in this changed world. But the phrase also rings true from yet another perspective in that we need to transition to a new energy paradigm very quickly if we want to keep the planet inhabitable in the near future and for centuries to come.

Almost no one today doubts that climate change is exacerbated by human activity. Global average temperatures are rising and this is leading to more severe weather occurrences throughout the world.

  • The year 2015 is now the hottest year on historical record globally and it has edged out the previous record of 2014 by a wide margin (+0.16°C, to be precise)
  • Fifteen of the sixteen hottest years on record globally have occurred after the year 2000
  • January 2016 was the hottest January on record, and February 2016 was the 372nd consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average. March 2016 also holds the record of being the hottest March since the year 1880 and the 11th consecutive month that a monthly global temperature has been broken; the longest such streak in the last 137 years! So, I will not be surprised if 2016 shatters 2015’s record as well.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5

Dear fellow stakeholders,

Just last March 2016, I sat with a crowd of over 700 other people here in Manila listening to Al Gore weave his two-hour presentation on the state of the global climate. His presentation, updated through the years, was even more impressive since the time I first saw it in 2006. It was all the more persuasive and alarming today, because climate data and observational evidence from all over the world just serves to strengthen the point he was making more than a decade ago: that man-made climate change is real, deadly serious, and we had better do something fast, if we want to avoid a global catastrophe.

I was struck as he emphasized a particular point: “All our infrastructure was built for a world that’s now changing.” Immediately, images of our typhoon-damaged plants in Leyte engulfed my mind. I’m sure you all remember, when Typhoon Yolanda hit in November 2013, much of what worked reasonably for close to four decades, particularly at our subsidiary, Energy Development Corporation’s (EDC) geothermal plants, was overwhelmed by a force no one had ever seen before. The forces unleashed by climate change are now more powerful than they’ve ever been, which necessitates that we build stronger as we move forward in this changed world. But the phrase also rings true from yet another perspective in that we need to transition to a new energy paradigm very quickly if we want to keep the planet inhabitable in the near future and for centuries to come.

Almost no one today doubts that climate change is exacerbated by human activity. Global average temperatures are rising and this is leading to more severe weather occurrences throughout the world.

  • The year 2015 is now the hottest year on historical record globally and it has edged out the previous record of 2014 by a wide margin (+0.16°C, to be precise)
  • Fifteen of the sixteen hottest years on record globally have occurred after the year 2000
  • January 2016 was the hottest January on record, and February 2016 was the 372nd consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average. March 2016 also holds the record of being the hottest March since the year 1880 and the 11th consecutive month that a monthly global temperature has been broken; the longest such streak in the last 137 years! So, I will not be surprised if 2016 shatters 2015’s record as well.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5